Singular & plural nouns (Explanatory notes)
1.
Explanation: Incorrect pluralization of uncountable nouns
A number of nouns in English are uncountable - they have no plural form (-s). e.g. rain, oil, water, news, persuasion, beauty.
1 The 'Hong Kong Dot Com' website contains many useful informations about Hong Kong.
2 The Chek Lap Kok airport uses state of the art landing equipments.
3 Teachers should be useful in giving students advices about oral presentations.
4 Some educationalists are now beginning to think that Hong Kong students get too much homeworks.
5 The main point of a Ph.D. is to carry out original researches.

Whether or not a noun is uncountable is determined by its meaning: an uncountable noun represents something which tends to be viewed as a whole or as a single entity, rather than as one of a number of items which can be counted as individual units. Singular verb forms are used with uncountable nouns.
The indefinite articles a, an and numbers are not normally used with uncountable nouns, e.g.
My grammar checker gave me a ( ) useful feedback.
Please give me an ( ) information about how to access the library on the web. (The plural form some could, however, be used here - I need some information about…..)
There are several ways to express quantity for uncountable nouns, e.g.
I read an ( ) interesting news this morning. an interesting item of news
Could I borrow a ( ) paper to make notes? a sheet/a piece of paper
Teachers should be able to give students a ( ) useful advices about oral presentations. some useful advice
2.
Explanation: Incorrect singular use of plural nouns
Some noun phrases can only be used in a plural form:
1 The 'Hong Kong Dot Com' website contains many useful informations about Hong Kong.
2 The Chek Lap Kok airport uses state of the art landing equipments.
3 Teachers should be useful in giving students advices about oral presentations.
4 Some educationalists are now beginning to think that Hong Kong students get too much homeworks.
5 The main point of a Ph.D. is to carry out original researches.
3.
Explanation: Incorrect pluralization of uncountable nouns
A number of nouns in English are uncountable - they have no plural form (-s). e.g. rain, oil, water, news, persuasion, beauty.
1 The 'Hong Kong Dot Com' website contains many useful informations about Hong Kong.
2 The Chek Lap Kok airport uses state of the art landing equipments.
3 Teachers should be useful in giving students advices about oral presentations.
4 Some educationalists are now beginning to think that Hong Kong students get too much homeworks.
5 The main point of a Ph.D. is to carry out original researches.

Whether or not a noun is uncountable is determined by its meaning: an uncountable noun represents something which tends to be viewed as a whole or as a single entity, rather than as one of a number of items which can be counted as individual units. Singular verb forms are used with uncountable nouns.
The indefinite articles a, an and numbers are not normally used with uncountable nouns, e.g.
My grammar checker gave me a ( ) useful feedback.
Please give me an ( ) information about how to access the library on the web. (The plural form some could, however, be used here - I need some information about…..)
There are several ways to express quantity for uncountable nouns, e.g.
I read an ( ) interesting news this morning. an interesting item of news
Could I borrow a ( ) paper to make notes? a sheet/a piece of paper
Teachers should be able to give students a ( ) useful advices about oral presentations. some useful advice
4.
Explanation: Don't use ‘Count’ determiners and adjectives directly in front of uncountable nouns
‘Count’ determiners and adjectives - many, few, several, etc. - are not used with uncountable nouns, e.g. 
The KCR needs many ( ) equipment to make sure it runs safely. a lot of
Fewer ( ) traffic would mean fewer ( ) pollution. less
Be careful when using the following uncountable nouns since they seem to cause particular problems for students. accommodation; equipment; luggage; health; research; news; advice; homework; rubbish; baggage; information; technology; behaviour; knowledge; traffic
5.
Explanation: Plural nouns - not ending in -s
There are a number of plural nouns which cause problems because they do not end in –s. Examples of these are media, data, bacteria, staff, public and people. Remember to use a plural verb form with such words, and not to add –s.
6.
Explanation: Don't use ‘Count’ determiners and adjectives directly in front of uncountable nouns
‘Count’ determiners and adjectives - many, few, several, etc. - are not used with uncountable nouns, e.g. 
The KCR needs many ( ) equipment to make sure it runs safely. a lot of
Fewer ( ) traffic would mean fewer ( ) pollution. less
Be careful when using the following uncountable nouns since they seem to cause particular problems for students. accommodation; equipment; luggage; health; research; news; advice; homework; rubbish; baggage; information; technology; behaviour; knowledge; traffic
7.
Explanation: Incorrect pluralization of uncountable nouns
A number of nouns in English are uncountable - they have no plural form (-s). e.g. rain, oil, water, news, persuasion, beauty.
1 The 'Hong Kong Dot Com' website contains many useful informations about Hong Kong.
2 The Chek Lap Kok airport uses state of the art landing equipments.
3 Teachers should be useful in giving students advices about oral presentations.
4 Some educationalists are now beginning to think that Hong Kong students get too much homeworks.
5 The main point of a Ph.D. is to carry out original researches.

Whether or not a noun is uncountable is determined by its meaning: an uncountable noun represents something which tends to be viewed as a whole or as a single entity, rather than as one of a number of items which can be counted as individual units. Singular verb forms are used with uncountable nouns.
The indefinite articles a, an and numbers are not normally used with uncountable nouns, e.g.
My grammar checker gave me a ( ) useful feedback.
Please give me an ( ) information about how to access the library on the web. (The plural form some could, however, be used here - I need some information about…..)
There are several ways to express quantity for uncountable nouns, e.g.
I read an ( ) interesting news this morning. an interesting item of news
Could I borrow a ( ) paper to make notes? a sheet/a piece of paper
Teachers should be able to give students a ( ) useful advices about oral presentations. some useful advice
8.
Explanation: Making Generalizations
If you are talking generally, use the plural form with countable nouns
It would also be possible to use the indefinite article:
On the net, students can send an assignment, watch a video clip or access a school library.

There are large differences in levels of computer literacies ( ) among university graduates. literacy
The IT sector continues to complain that good qualities ( ) local graduates cannot be found in Hong Kong. quality
If you have feedbacks ( ) on this site please fill in the form provided. feedback

9.
Explanation: Incorrect singular use of plural nouns
Some noun phrases can only be used in a plural form:
1 Good communication skill are invaluable in the service industries. skills
2 It is now generally agreed  that environmental condition is deteriorating in Hong Kong. conditions…are
3 Some people don't care much about their immediate surrounding as long as property prices keep increasing. surroundings
4 Teachers' earning is quite low compared to business people. earnings are
5 Some companies are now moving their headquarter out of Hong Kong to Shenzen. headquarters
10.

Explanation: Nouns - used only in the plural form
A number of nouns in English are used only in the plural form (and with plural verb forms). Examples of these are goods, groceries, jeans, trousers and scissors.

Other nouns are normally used in plural form in certain structures, e.g. 
Working conditions are slowly improving in a number of Chinese industries.
The course helped me to improve my communication skills.
Living standards are not rising as quickly in rural areas.